Friday, April 24, 2009

Min Ko Naing - 2009 Gwangju Prize for Human Rights Awardee

(foto courtesy of - http://www.thebestfriend.org/cont/hero.htm)


Congratulations to Min Ko Naing, the NLDA and the rest of the Burmese Freedom Fighters! Min Ko Naing is the recipient of the prestigious 2009 Gwangju Prize for Human Rights!

This is the link to Korean website of The May 18 Memorial Foundation's announcement of Min Ko Naing for his achievement:

http://tinyurl.com/cyk6zq

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Text of the announcement of the of The May 18 Memorial Foundation, sent via email.


2009 Gwangju Prize for Human Rights Award Announcement

The situation regarding democracy and human rights in Myanmar/Burma remains dire. At this very moment, many pro-democracy activists are locked up in freezing cold cells. The international community has put pressure on Burma’s military junta, taking consistent interest in the nation’s pro-democracy movement. Despite its efforts, some countries around the world have turned a deaf ear to the issue due to conflicts of interest. After the military junta crushed the “Saffron Revolution” with brutal force, the UN special envoy Ibrahim Gambari visited Burma, meeting with Aung San Suu Kyi, a democratic leader of the country, in 2008. However, such efforts to demonstrate the international community’s commitment to the region have been to no avail, and have only led to further disappointment with Burma.

Born in the Burmese capital of Yangon in 1962, Min Ko Naing organized the All Burma Federation of Student Unions (ABFSU), a nationwide student union, in 1988. Later, he was sentenced to 20 years’ imprisonment for triggering the “8888 Uprising”. After being imprisoned for 15 years, he was released from prison and continued his pro-democracy resistance. Finally he was re-arrested and sentenced to 65 years imprisonment for organizing a demonstration which gave rise to the Saffron Uprising. He is currently serving this sentence.

According to an international human rights watchdog, the number of prisoners of conscience who, like Min Ko Naing, have been arrested and imprisoned for engaging in protests and anti-government activities, amounts to about 2,000. In the aftermath of the devastating natural disaster which hit Burma in May, 2007, the international community tried to reach out to the afflicted country. Burma’s military junta, however, decided to reject this helping hand. To make matters worse, the authoritarian regime arrested and detained protesters, killing at least several hundred people, including foreign journalists, involved in the nationwide demonstration driven by saffron-robed Buddhist monks.

The 2009 Gwangju Prize for Human Rights Committee has therefore chosen Min Ko Naing to be this year’s prizewinner. Min Ko Naing and his colleagues have devoted themselves to Burma’s democratization, and it is their devotion that we hope to remember and share as we commemorate the May 18 Gwangju Uprising. The committee sincerely desires that Min Ko Naing and other political prisoners be released as soon as possible, and hopes that democracy will truly take root in this country.


2009 Gwangju Prize for Human Rights Committee

Chairperson:
Moon Young-hee, Vice President of Korea Democracy Foundation

Committee Members:
Kim Chil-jun, Secretary-General of National Human Rights Commission
Yoon Gwang-jang, Chairman of the May 18 Memorial Foundation
Lee Jung-hyun, Korea National Assembly
Cha Sung-hwan, Director of Pusan Democratic Memorial Association


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Below is the profile of Min Ko Naing:

Min Ko Naing (born 18 October 1962), whose name literally means "conqueror of kings" was born Paw Oo Tun in Rangoon (Yangon), Burma. He is the President of Universities Student Union, Burma, however never approved official. He is one of the most well-known political dissidents in Burma

Biography


He was born in Yangon. He is third son of U Thet Nyunt and Daw Hla Kyi. His parent are mon-chinese race from Mudon in Mon State. He has three brothers and sister. They are Daw Kyi Kyi Nyunt, Daw Ye Ye Nyunt, Daw Thadar Nyunt. He attended No.4 Basic Education Middle School, Thingyangyun Township, Yangon. At August 28 1988 he was the chairman of All Burma Federation of Student Unions (ABFSU). He live in No(151/Ka), Waizayantar Road, (16/2) Ward, Thingangyun Township, Yangon.

Early life/student years


Min Ko Naing's interest in politics began at the Rangoon Arts and Science University in the mid-1980s where he studied Zoology. During his student years, he was an active member of the arts club, where he enjoyed reading, writing poems and drawing cartoons, especially satirical ones. According to people who knew him, Min Ko Naing was a member of a performance troupe which took part in the traditional Than Gyat competition during the annual Water Festival Thingyan in April, called "Goat-Mouth and Spirit-Eye" and performed satirical plays and sketches satirizing Myanmar's government and the lack of freedom and democracy.


Student unions at that time, as now, were illegal in Burma; however he and other students formed secret study groups in anticipation of protests against the worsening economic conditions in Myanmar. As the first signs of serious public unrest in Burma began to appear in 1985, the year Ne Win's Burma Socialist Programme Party demonetized the 100-kyat note, Min Ko Naing and his close colleagues secretly established an underground student union in anticipation of a political uprising.

Involvement with All Burma Federation of Student Unions


Min Ko Naing formed and organized the All Burma Federation of Student Unions (ABFSU), a nationwide student union to oppose decades of illegitimate military rule. The student union has largely contributed to the 8888 Uprising, during which millions of people marched on the streets, protesting against the dictatorship ruling the country and calling for democracy. Unfortunately, the military regime, now known as the State Peace and Development Council, responded to the uprising with brutal force, gunning down up to 10,000 persons.

15 years political imprisonment until 2004


Min Ko Naing has been forced to go "underground", continuing his organizing work while being forced to hide and to move from house to house every night, in order to avoid arrest. After several months,however, he has been captured along with other students and sentenced to 20 years' imprisonment, under Section 5(j) of the 1950 Emergency Provisions Act, vaguely-worded legislation which is frequently used to imprison political prisoners, for instigating, according to the military regime, "disturbances to the detriment of law and order, peace and tranquility". His sentence was commuted to 10 years under a general amnesty in January 1993.He has been considered a prisoner of conscience by Amnesty International, which intensively campaigned for his release.


According to Amnesty International, Min Ko Naing has been severely tortured and ill-treated during the early stages of his detention and his health suffered as a consequence. During his interrogation he was reportedly forced to stand in water for two weeks until he collapsed, and as a result, his left foot became totally numb. In 19 November 2004, he was released from prison, after being imprisoned for 15 years.

Second political imprisonment


However, after almost two years of his release in 2004, Min Ko Naing, along with other four leading student leaders, was rearrested in late September of 2006. The other four arrested student leaders were Ko Ko Gyi, who was freed from prison in 2005, Htay Kywe, Min Zeya and Pyone Cho. Despite the military regime's insistence that it was just taking these student leaders into detention for questioning, the authorities later confirmed the arrest of Min Ko Naing, as well as the other student leaders, stating that the five student leaders were held as a precaution against what the regime called internal commotion, instability and terrorism. After heavy criticism about the arrests and demands for his immediate release, the authorities released Min Ko Naing on January 11, 2007.

Campaigns


From 10 October 2006 to 18 October 2006 (his 44th Birthday), a nationwide campaign, “White Expression” was held to pressure the military government to release him and all of political prisoners. The rest 88 generation students (who were not arrested by junta at that time) organized the campaign. Participants wore white clothing in a show of support for the release of all political prisoners. The 88 generation students also organized the signature campaign to pressure the junta to release him and all political prisoners. It was started a week after Min Ko Naing and four colleagues were arrested. Many well-known artistes from Myanmar (such as Ludu Daw Amar and Zarganar) signed in the petition.


His 88 Generation Students group organized a campaign called “Open Heart Campaign”. It was launched on January 4, 2007, Independence Day of Myanmar. He said to the Irrawaddy Magazine that the campaign was to encourage the people to exercise freedom of expression. People could write to State Peace and Development Council leader senior general Than Shwe about their feelings under the military government.


He and his 88 Generation Students group conducted “White Sunday” campaign from 11 March 2007 to 20 May 2007 to express support to family members of political prisoners. They visited the families of political prisoners in Yangon (Rangoon) every Sunday during this period


Political imprisonment in 2007


He was arrested again around midnight on 21 August 2007, with other 13 leaders of the 88 Generation Students for organizing peaceful demonstrations. United States Government condemned the Burmese junta's arrest of them.

International Awards Min Ko Naing has won international awards for his efforts, such as the Civil Courage Prize 2005, the Homo Homini Award by People in Need Foundation, the Student Peace Prize in 2001 and the John Humphrey Freedom Award in 1999.


Source: http://www.thebestfriend.org/cont/hero.htm



Related read:

Min Ko Naing, “Conqueror Of Kings”
Burma’s Student Leader
Megan Clymer1

During the democracy uprising in 1988, Paw Oo Htun, whose
nom de guerre, Min Ko Naing, means Conqueror of Kings,
emerged as one of the movement’s most prominent student
leaders. Together with other student leaders, he revived the
umbrella students’ organization, the All Burma Federation of
Student Unions. Today, while serving out a twenty year prison
sentence, Min Ko Naing remains a symbol of the Burmese
student movement.

Burma’s university students have long been at the heart of political
movements in Burma. Since 1920, when they boycotted the Rangoon
University Act, students have played a role in all major political
events in Burma. In particular, Burmese student unions were
instrumental in training student leaders. Aung San, Burma’s most
famous leader and independence hero, began his career as a student
leader; his expulsion from Rangoon University, along with fellow
student, Ko Nu, provided the catalyst for the 1936 student strikes.
Likewise, many of Burma’s other well-known leaders—U Nu, Aung
San’s successor, U Thant, former secretary-general of the United
Nations, and Ne Win, Burma’s dictator for twenty six years—were
once student leaders.

On the following day, August 28, 1988, the ABFSU hosted the
congress on the RASU campus. Thousands of people attended. As
Chairman, Min Ko Naing gave the opening address, which according
to Thu Rein, “everyone liked;” he received “the loudest applause
from the audience.” Min Ko Naing described a metaphorical wall
built by the BSPP in the 1962 coup. “In the beginning the wall was
too thick—we could not destroy it,” he said. “But, from 1962 to
1988 our older brothers and sisters have been trying to destroy this
wall. More and more cracks have appeared in the wall since that day
in 1962. Now the wall is weak enough. If we unite, and push down
the wall, it will totally crumble and fall down.”

Min Ko Naing closed with his poem entitled “Faith.” “He
spoke excitedly,” remembers Thu Rein. As he read each line of the
poem, the crowed repeated after him:
(Megan Clymer, 48 The Journal of Burma Studies, Volume 8
Min Ko Naing, “Conqueror Of Kings”
Journal of Burma Studies, Volume 8 49)

Faith
In memory of our comrades,
Who have sacrificed their lives for our national cause,
I make this pledge of faith.
In this unfinished revolution,
Should my blood be not red enough,
Splash your blood over me
As a potion to make me brave.
In this unfinished revolution,
Should my soul be gripped with fear,
Be hesitant and lack courage,
Let your souls enter into mine
And steer me along.
In this unfinished revolution,
Should I
Become traitor to our proud people
And act inconsiderately and recklessly
With your firm
Peacock hands
Crush and punish me.
In this unfinished revolution,
Should I have to sacrifice my life half-way
It is no sorrow to leave this world.
As a duty fulfilled, I will believe
My soul enhanced with joy,
And holding up our peacock flag flapping in the wind
I will come to where you are.
Welcome me with open arms.



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Source: 1 Megan Clymer is a graduate student at the Johns Hopkins Institute for
Policy Studies in Baltimore, MD where she studies international affairs and
civil society. She lived with the Burmese community on the Thai-Burma
border for two months in 2000. The author would like to acknowledge the
contribution of the following: Bo Kyi, Moe Thee Zun, Thu Rein, Min Zin,
Aung Din, Hlwan Moe, Aung Saw Oo, Kyaw Thura, Brian Joseph, Burton
Levin, Kenton and Marlee Clymer, Wayne Clymer, Ruth Arrowsmith,
Hans-Dieter Evers, Myint Zan, Rajshekhar, and Scott Haddock.



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Min Ko Naing: A Voice of Defiance and a Voice of Hope
by Rohingya Human Rights
2008-10-06 09:25:18


Staring at the eye of the presiding judge in the courtroom at Rangoon's notorious Insein Prison on September 09, 2008, a towering figure of Burma's pro-democracy movement, Min Ko Naing addressed in a thunder voice,“You can sentence us to a thousand years in prison for our political activities, but we will continue to defend ourselves in accordance with the law. Nobody can hide from justice.” Min Ko Naing made this defiant statement when he and 34 other detained former student leaders of the 88 Generation Students' group appeared in the Rangoon East District Court, located in Insein Prison.


Their lawyer, Nyi Nyi Hlaing said that they were facing a variety of charges related to their involvement in last year’s protests. In fact, this protest of the former leaders of the 88 Generation Students' group in last year’s August has ultimately turned into the largest anti-regime demonstrations in twenty years since 1988 and became known as the Saffron Revolution drawing tens of thousands of monks and the common people to the streets of Rangoon and all other major cities of the country demanding the end of the despotic military rule which has turned the country into a pauper state and forced millions of the people to live a miserable life with half-naked body full of hunger and grief.


Min Ko Naing and his colleagues were charged of violations of Electronics Act 33A, the Illegal Organizations Act 17/1 and Section 4 of SPDC Law No 5/96, which prohibits actions that “endanger the national convention”.. Mentionably, it is the guidelines of the stage-managed farcical National Convention where only the military hand-picked delegates have attended and which has paved the way for the 54-member Constitution Drafting Commission to draft a pro-military constitution on which the military regime staged a referendum drama in the country on last May 2008 and is going to be followed by the general elections in 2010. This sham constitution contains all the provisions to glorify the militarism in the governance where the head of the army will be the most powerful person in the country, with the ability to appoint key cabinet figures and suspend the constitution in the event of an emergency that he defines. It also stipulates that no amendments to the charter can be made without the consent of more than 75 percent of lawmakers, making changes impossible without the support of the military representatives in Parliament who occupy 110 seats out of the 440-seat lower house which is called Pyithu Hluttaw (House of Representatives), and 56 seats out of the 224-seat upper house which is called Amyotha Hluttaw (House of Nationalities). Moreover, in the event of a "state of emergency" which the tatmadaw (armed forces) is given the authority to declare at any time, the commander in chief would assume full legislative, executive and judicial powers.


They were also charged with violating Article 130B of the Penal Code, which prohibits libel against friendly foreign powers, which stemmed from their alleged criticism of China and Russia for their role in vetoing a draft UN Security Council resolution on Burma in January 2007. They were also accused of speaking with the exiled media and the recorded interviews and other items uploaded to Web sites operated by Burmese exiles were produced as evidence.


On August 27, 2008, the authority was formally requested to permit Min Ko Naing and his colleagues to appear in the court without handcuffs, but they were brought to the courtroom in handcuffs. Many of these veterans of Burma’s pro-democracy movement have spent more than a decade in prison for their political activities. Besides Min Ko Naing and Ko Ko Gyi, other prominent members of the 88 Generation Students’ Group who are now in detention, include Htay Win Aung, Min Zeya, Mya Aye and Kyaw Min Yu - also known as Ko Jimmy.


The original name of Min Ko Naing is Paw U Tun . He was born on 18 October 1962 in Rangoon. He is the third son of U Thet Nyunt and Daw Hla Kyi. His parent are mon-chinese race from Mudon in Mon State . He has three sisters. They are Daw Kyi Kyi Nyunt, Daw Ye Ye Nyunt, Daw Thadar Nyunt. His family lives in No(151/Ka), Waizayantar Road , (16/2) Ward, Thingangyun Township , Rangon.


Min Ko Naing literally means "conqueror of kings" which was adopted as a pseudonym by Paw U Tun and by at least 18 other students in 1988 to sign posters and leaflets criticizing the military rule. While a student at the University of Rangoon in the 1980s, Min Ko Naing secretly organized a nationwide student union to oppose decades of military rule. In March 1988, demonstrations began in Rangoon, the then capital of Burma to protest the government mismanagement of the country’s economy which turned the resource-rich Burma into the world’s poorest country and was accorded Least Developed Nation status by the UN that year in the wake of the demonetization of much of the Burmese currency in 1987 by the military government of General Ne Win. This has eventually led to an unprecedented civil unrest. And Min Ko Naing soon emerged as a leader, encouraging people to use peaceful means to express their frustration. At the height of the mass civil disobedience campaign against 26 years of one-party military rule in Burma, the All Burma Federation of Student Unions (ABFSU) was formed on 28 August 1988 and Min Ko Naing was made the chairman of the ABFSU. At the founding rally of the ABFSU, Min Ko Naing called on students throughout the country to struggle peacefully against military rule and for democracy and freedom of association.


After violently suppressing the pro-democracy demonstrations and gunning down about 10,000 people in August 1988, the military seized power again in September 1988 and formed a new government, called the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC). Martial law decrees were issued, including a ban on any criticism of the military and of any public gathering of more than five people. They arrested hundreds of students for their political opposition activities. Although thousands of young activists fled to neighboring countries, others continued their struggle inside the country. In March 1989, the SLORC began to issue warnings against possible memorial gatherings by students and others to mark the first anniversaries of the deaths of student demonstrators during the initial waves of civil unrest in March 1988.


On 24 March 1989, Min Ko Naing was arrested and was sentenced to 20 years' imprisonment under Section 5(j) of the 1950 Emergency Provisions Act, vaguely-worded legislation which is frequently used to imprison political prisoners. Later, his 20 years’ imprisonment was commuted to 10 years under a general amnesty.

During the early stages of his detention, Min Ko Naing was severely tortured and ill-treated and his health suffered as a consequence. During his interrogation he was reportedly forced to stand in water for two weeks until he collapsed, and as a result, his left foot became totally numb.


For most of his imprisonment Min Ko Naing has been held in complete solitary confinement. In November 1994 the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Burma was also allowed to visit him briefly in prison, and described him as being nervous and thin. Subsequent reports on his health stated that, although it improved, he suffers from a nervous tremor and may have suffered emotionally as a result of his ill-treatment and prolonged solitary confinement. He is believed to suffer from a gastric ulcer. On April 22,2008, a statement of the US State Department said, military-ruled Burma's imprisoned pro-democracy activist Min Ko Naing may go blind after failing to receive medical treatment.


Mentionably, political prisoners in Burma routinely face torture during the initial phases of detention when they are often interrogated for hours or even days at a time by rotating teams of Military Intelligence (MI) personnel. During the interrogation, the members of the security forces continue to use torture as a means of extracting information; to punish political prisoners and members of ethnic minorities; and as a means of instilling fear in anyone critical of the military government. Even after sentencing, the political prisoners are vulnerable to torture and ill-treatment, when they can be punished for breaking arbitrary prison rules such as possessing writing paper. In addition, conditions in most prisons are harsh, due to the lack of adequate food, water, sanitation and medical care.


After 15 years in prison, Min Ko Naing was released on 19 November 2004, but was rearrested in late September 2006 after almost two years of his release along with other leading student leaders like Ko Ko Gyi, who was freed from prison in 2005, Htay Kywe, Min Zeya and Pyone Cho. On January 11, 2007, he was released again. And for the last time, he was arrested again at midnight on 21 August 2007, with other 13 leaders of the 88 Generation Students for organizing the Saffron Revolution.


Min Ko Naing is one of the few top opposition leaders after democracy icon Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. The military regime repeatedly tried to break his spirit. In 1994, the then-U.S. Congressman Bill Richardson visited Min Ko Naing in prison and informed him the regime would permit him to be deported to the United States in exchange for his release, but he refused. For his extraordinary efforts and courage, he won many international awards such as the Civil Courage Prize 2005, the Homo Homini Award by People in Need Foundation, the Student Peace Prize in 2001 and the John Humphrey Freedom Award in Canada on 10 December 1999 and on this occasion, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi made comments about him in a videotaped message which was smuggled out of Burma, “[Min Ko Naing] is one of the student leaders who started the 1988 movement for democracy, and he has stood firm against all pressure from the authorities...[he] represents many others who are suffering from the injustices of the present military regime. That the prize has been awarded to him gives us all great hope, great pride, and great pleasure, because it shows that the world has not forgotten our cause....''.


Min Ko Naing is a leader with a very clear vision on the future of Burmese people and the country. The military regime has physically detained him in prison, but could not imprison thousands of Min Ko Naing of the young generation who are continuing their fight against the military regime idiolizing him with the hope to snatch away the sun of liberty, democracy and peace in Burma and therefore, Min Ko Naing himself has rightly said, “......... I'll never die.. Physically I might be dead, but many more Min Ko Naing would appear to take my place..."#


Source: www.rohingyareview.com




Related news:

http://www.mizzima.com/news/regional/2013-min-ko-naing-bestowed-gwangju-human-rights-award.html




Tuesday, April 21, 2009

2009 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award Launched




Below is an excerpt of the launching of the 2009 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award PEBA:

In its second year, PEBA will recognize Pinoy Expats and OFWs bloggers making a difference in their lives, workplace, community, the Philippines and the world in general.

This year, the theme is:

“Filipinos Abroad – Hope of the Nation, Gift to the World”.

Cognizant and directly affected by the brunt of global financial crisis, Filipinos continue to anchor their hope and trust to their family members abroad as herald of better news and good tidings. Thus, reinforcing the OFWs and Filipino expats role and image as new heroes and saviors.

PEBA also recognizes that Filipinos wherever they are, be it land-based, sea-based or air-based as the case maybe, are shining examples of dedication, diligence, and excellence in almost anything they do. It is not uncommon for them to be praised as assets to companies and organizations contributing to the social and economic well being of their host country. PEBA considers the more than 12m overseas Filipinos scattered abroad as gifts to make this world a better place to live.



Links:



Official Site - http://pinoyblogawards.blogspot.com/

Wikipedia cited PEBA here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog_award#Other_Blog_Awards

Blog Catalog Group of PEBA - http://www.blogcatalog.com/group/pinoy-expatofw-blog-award-2009

Facebook of PEBA - http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=95024521334&ref=mf


Let us all support and join 2009 Top 10 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award!




PINOY EXPATS/OFW BLOG AWARDS: Global Launch of the 2009 Top 10 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award

2009 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award Launched




Below is an excerpt of the launching of the 2009 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award PEBA:

In its second year, PEBA will recognize Pinoy Expats and OFWs bloggers making a difference in their lives, workplace, community, the Philippines and the world in general.

This year, the theme is:

“Filipinos Abroad – Hope of the Nation, Gift to the World”.

Cognizant and directly affected by the brunt of global financial crisis, Filipinos continue to anchor their hope and trust to their family members abroad as herald of better news and good tidings. Thus, reinforcing the OFWs and Filipino expats role and image as new heroes and saviors.

PEBA also recognizes that Filipinos wherever they are, be it land-based, sea-based or air-based as the case maybe, are shining examples of dedication, diligence, and excellence in almost anything they do. It is not uncommon for them to be praised as assets to companies and organizations contributing to the social and economic well being of their host country. PEBA considers the more than 12m overseas Filipinos scattered abroad as gifts to make this world a better place to live.



Links:



Official Site - http://pinoyblogawards.blogspot.com/

Blog Unite - http://www.bloggersunite.org/event/2009-top-10-pinoy-expatofw-blog-award

Wikipedia cited PEBA here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog_award#Other_Blog_Awards

Blog Catalog Group of PEBA - http://www.blogcatalog.com/group/pinoy-expatofw-blog-award-2009

Facebook of PEBA - http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=95024521334&ref=mf


Let us all support and join 2009 Top 10 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award!




PINOY EXPATS/OFW BLOG AWARDS: Global Launch of the 2009 Top 10 Pinoy Expat/OFW Blog Award

Saturday, April 18, 2009

Joy RojasTakbong Pangarap 2009

From joy roxas


12 pairs of rubber shoes ready for use

120 days allotted to complete the run

100 days for running

20 days allotted for rest

5,000 kilometers to complete the trans-American run

50 kilometers to cover per day

6-7 hours to run a day

8 minutes to run each kilometer

1 woman, a Filipina named Joy Rojas to prove that there’s no limit to the Filipino Spirit!


Takbong Pangarap is Joy’s dream run, the ultimate (but perhaps not the penultimate) run of her life after proving herself that she can reach Pagudpud from Davao on foot. Covering a distance of 2,000 km South to North of the Philippines. Why run, like Forrest Gump? Joy derives happiness in running. It is also her goal to inspire people to live longer with a healthier lifestyle and raise funds for the two beneficiaries of the run. Both the Social Services Division of the Philippine Heart Center and the Anti-TB Program of the Inner Wheel Club of Quezon City District 378 will benefit from this project.

She thanked and encouraged bloggers to help her promote her cause online and reach out to the whole global Filipino community worldwide for support in a bloggers event held at Powerbooks this afternoon.

Joy will start her run in California, USA on 10 May 2009 just in time for her 44th birthday and hopeful to conclude it by September 8, 2009 in New York City. Filipinos communities in the US are being invited to join her when she run and pass by the States where they live. Aside from the 100 days allotted for running she will also have 20 days for rest and meeting with Filipinos/Fil-ams and raise awareness on the issue of TB (Tuberculosis), running, healthy lifestyle, and inspire these communities that there’s ”no limit to the Filipino Spirit” with Joy’ feat as example.

This endeavor for now is relying on the help and assistance of volunteers, few corporate sponsorships and donations. The Takbong Pangarap Team is calling on Filipinos from around the globe to extend their assistance in kind (moral/spiritual support, word of mouth) and in cash.





Also, bloggers are encouraged to post their blog to help promote this event through this link:
Takbong Pangarap (Dream Run)/Trans-USA Run 2009
http://www.bloggersunite.org/event/takbong-pangarapdream-runtrans-usa-run-2009




Other Important Promotional Links


Official Site
http://www.thepoc.net/index.php/Takbong-Pangarap/

Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Takbong-Pangarap/67564894131


Twitter
http://www.twitter.com/takbongpangarap


Plurk
http://www.plurk.com/takbongpangarap


Digg
http://digg.com/d1p5aw


Stumble Upon
http://www.stumbleupon.com/toolbar/#topic=Running&url=http%253A%252F%252Fwww.bloggersunite.org%252Fevent%252Ftakbong-pangarapdream-runtrans-usa-run-2009

Delicious
http://feeds.delicious.com/v2/rss/peterahon?count=15




Thursday, April 16, 2009

Hubspot Website Grader


A website grade of 96.5/100 for peterahon.blogspot.com means that of the hundreds of thousands of websites that have previously been evaluated, our algorithm has calculated that this site scores higher than 96.5% of them in terms of its marketing effectiveness. The algorithm uses a proprietary blend of over 50 different variables, including search engine data, website structure, approximate traffic, site performance, and others.

The website peterahon.blogspot.com ranks 31,163 of the 906,057 websites that have been ranked so far. The software is constantly being upgraded and the algorithm enhanced. The number of potential recommendations provided by the tool is also increasing frequently.



Website is assessed according to ON/OFF page SEO using: metadata, images, interior page analysis, readability level, google page rank, google indexed pages, traffic rank, in bound links, blog analysis by way of technorati and alexa, social bookmarks like diggs and delicious.

Details of their assessment on my blog here: http://grader.com/site/peterahon.blogspot.com

The web technologies on metrics are being born each day but not a definitive metrics have been establish yet to claim that theie measure is the be and all of web metrics. Still I'd invite you to check them out. Of course hubspot has a product to sell. Check their links here:

http://www.hubspot.com/archive/sbsm-webinar/

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Freebie culture or free culture?





Once again, thanks to azrael for the invite to join bloggers at AIM (Asian Institue of Management). The invite was posted at plurk, and since it is a bloggers gathering, and I’ve been wanting to get immersed with the bloggers activities here in the country, I requested to be invited.

But what I thought as a listening event turned out as a talking event for me. The veritable Pinoy adage “Nautusan lang bumili ng suka” (asked to buy vinegar) applied to me this afternoon. I signed up to listen and lo, I was invited by Regnard to be in front and join the rest of Pinoy bloggers who have made and continue to carve their names in Pinoy blogosphere.

AIM offered the course Winning Internet Marketing Strategies & Tactics for the first time to marketing & media executives. The sharing of bloggers and interaction with the course participants were very informative for me. I gained new insight and learning on blogger’s credibility and maintaining loyal readers through blog content.

Well although I am becoming more of a blog pragmatic more than a blog romantic (with all the ads that clutter my blog), the session was a good chance for marketing and media executives to understand the kind of animals bloggers are and the kind of jungle they would want themselves to engage in their attempt to catch up with the current trends of bloggers promoting and marketing products and services.

Although one of the negative and downtrend effect observe by Noemi lately with bloggers being invited and promoting events is the rise of “freebie culture” (although, I subscribe to the advocacy of Lawrence Lessig FREE CULTURE). Bloggers tend to become too dependent and expectant of freebies from these events. And the sole reason for them to blog is to promote events. Although bloggers have the right to blog whatever they want but their credibility and status among their fellow bloggers would be judged based on the kind and quality of their blogs. So perhaps more reason for event organizers to tap such kind of bloggers!

Well, then, I would not be so surprised to see more of promotional bloggers, events bloggers, marketing bloggers, paid to blog bloggers and the like with the interest of marketing and media executives to tap bloggers services. Good or bad? Well it is the economy that is stupid or otherwise? Whatever, this is a new development, I will watch and see!

Also at AIM, I got to meet new blogger friends like markku, anton, jayvee, and jonel, do visit their sites by clicking their name.

Monday, April 13, 2009

love ecard and the rose







Sunday, April 12, 2009

Happy Easter: when people come into our life


People come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime.
When you know which one it is,
you will know what to do for that person..



a REASON

When someone is in your life for a REASON,
it is usually to meet a need you have expressed..
They have come to assist you through a difficulty,
to provide you with guidance and support,
to aid you physically, emotionally or spiritually.
They may seem like a godsend and they are.
They are there for the reason you need them to be.

Then, without any wrongdoing on your part or at an inconvenient time,
This person will say or do something to bring the relationship to an end.
Sometimes they die.
Sometimes they walk away.
Sometimes they act up and force you to take a stand.
What we must realize is that our need has been met,
our desire fulfilled, their work is done.
The prayer you sent up has been answered and now it is time to move on.


a SEASON

Some people come into your life for a SEASON,
because your turn has come to share, grow or learn.
They bring you an experience of peace or make you laugh.
They may teach you something you have never done.
They usually give you an unbelievable amount of joy.
Believe it, it is real.
But only for a season.



a LIFETIME

LIFETIME relationships teach you lifetime lessons,
Things you must build upon in order to have a solid emotional foundation.
Your job is to accept the lesson,
Love the person and put what you have learned to use in all other relationships and areas of your life.
It is said that love is blind but friendship is clairvoyant.


Thank you for being a part of my life,
Whether you were for many reasons, or four season or once of a lifetime.
You are a friend, a lover, a partner or beloved indeed...

Saturday, April 11, 2009

Domingo Kinnit

Domingo Kinnit – Ilocano’s way of breaking fast and abstinence from meat eating

Growing up in Ilocos in the 80’s and 90’s during Lent, Domingo Kinnit is Easter or the Sunday of Christ Resurrection is a looking forward day for us kids. Domingo Kinnit (Sunday Bite), the word “kinnit” is an Ilocano word for bite. Children are encouraged by adults to fast. Since adults fast, rarely would you find meat to bite during lent. For Ilocanos it is easy since vegetable dishes cooked in bagoong (inabraw or dinengdeng) and grilled fish (tinuno nga ikan) is a common fare.

So it is natural that during Easter Sunday families would butcher animals that were fattened for the occasion of Domingo Kinnit. Be it chicken or goat. Or when an affluent family feels blessed enough to share their blessings they have a pig butchered and shared to the rest of their relatives. Some practical families would also have the pig sold por kilo on an “utang” or loaned basis. And the rest of the meat or bony parts would be cooked in dishes like igado or adobo, shared as a common meal or served as “padigo” give-away food for the neighbors and close relatives.

But these days I observed that the practice of fasting during lent is not so much observed. The menfolks find it a time to drink together. Some of my Catholics friends seems to have their “kinnit” during the whole time of the lent. Well I pretty understand my Chinese friends who are Buddhists and does not observe the practice.

Having been in Saudi Arabia for two and half years and 10 months of living with a Muslim co-intern in Korea I had a chance of observing fasting during the Holy month of Ramadan. Fasting from sunrise to sunset, not even water to drink during those days. It is both for spiritual ( to be in spiritual solidarity with the Muslim brothers and sisters) and health reason, time to detoxify and lose weight. Indeed it is such a wonderful and joyful spiritual experience to break the fast at iftar. Although in Riyadh, I would only find men sharing meals together in public places after Salah, the women are together segrated from the men to break their fast.

Well for whatever reasons you made a fast or did not observe abstinence for spiritual or health reasons, have a joyous Domingo Kinnit, and for the vegetarians, they too can have a bite of their gluten or vegemeat dishes.

Happy Easter and grab that bite!




Related Read:

Recreating Medieval Lent

Agnes deLanvallei, Kathy Keeler
This article was published in Tournaments Illuminated, Winter 2003.
http://anvil.unl.edu/agnes/RecreatingLent.htm





Friday, April 03, 2009

Thanks to Gmail: Gmail turns 5




Below is the welcome message of Gmail to me when I opened my account in 2005. Ever since I have created several email addys making use of them to host my photos at picasa, blog, google groups, chat and other uses making my online life a lot better.

I keep an email for official/professional use, an email to enroll to all subscriptions and sign-ups and an email for ordinary or regular use to keep in touch with friends. I have encouraged and invited several friends to create their account as well.

I am glad though that lately so much developments are taking place at google mail and I am not able to keep up with them. Although I make use of them whenever I get a chance to come across those developments. The latest development that I am using is the labeling like yahoo I've been wanting to have my emails archived in different folders for easy access. Although I must admit based from experience the gmail search function is very reliable, aside from marking with asterisk/star those emails you want to keep as priority.

There are other labs features to maximize but I am keeping mine at the minimum only using those functionality that are useful to me.

Thanks to gmail for the free email. I hope from 2 gig disk space it will be 5 as you have turned half decade... well that be interesting... no need to erase those emails with attachments.



from : Gmail Team
to: Pete Rahon
date: Tue, Feb 22, 2005 at 10:14 PM
subject: Gmail is different. Here's what you need to know.
mailed-by google.com

hide details 2/22/05
Reply



First off, welcome. And thanks for opening a Gmail account! We think Gmail is different. So to help you get started, you may want to:

* Check out our Getting Started guide. It's good for, well, getting started.
* Visit our Help Center. Here you can browse frequently asked questions, search for answers and learn about some of Gmail's cool features, like labels, keyboard shortcuts and free POP access.
* Import your contacts to Gmail from Yahoo! Mail, Outlook, Hotmail and other programs. Then email your friends with your brand new Gmail address.

As you're using Gmail, you might also see some ads or related links. We believe that you shouldn't have to share your inbox with large, blinking, irrelevant ads. Gmail's small text ads are matched by computers, and designed to be relevant to the messages you're viewing. Which means for once, you might even find ads to be interesting and useful.

Users have often told us that the more they use Gmail, the more they discover its added benefits--such as being able to find any message instantly or to manage all your contacts in one place. So go ahead and give it a try. In the meantime, we'll keep working on making Gmail the best email service around. Thanks for joining us for the ride. We hope you'll enjoy Google's approach to email.


Thanks,

The Gmail Team


P.S. You can sign in to your account any time by visiting http://gmail.google.com


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